Apple Varieties

During the Fall, we will update current varieties available here!

Honeycrisp
Honeycrisp

The Honeycrisp was developed from a 1960 cross of Macoun and Honeygold varieties at the University of Minnesota. It was released for commercial use in 1991 and has become one of the most popular eating apples in the world! Honeycrisp has a distinctive red and yellow skin and is extremely crisp, juicy and both sweet and tart, which results in its wide appeal.

Pazazz
Pazazz

Pazazz apples are a cross between the famous Honeycrisp and a top secret (i.e. unknown) apple. Pazazz was discovered by Doug Shefelbine in Holmen, Wisconsin and went into commercial production in 2013. In 2014, Ferguson's planted 40,000 Pazazz trees, making them the largest Pazazz growers in the Midwest. They will begin to pop up on grocery store shelves in 2015 and after. The Pazazz is red with the same crispy texture as the Honeycrisp, with just the right blend of sweet and tart.

Zestar
Zestar

The Zestar! apple was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1999. Sweet and tart, juicy and crisp, it is sold as an "early Honeycrisp." Since it is an early variety, it should be eaten soon after purchase.

RiverBelle
RiverBelle

The RiverBelle was discovered by Doug Shefelbine in Holmen, Wisconsin. The Riverbelle is an earlier variety which is best grown in Wisconsin and Minnesota. RiverBelles sometimes have a unique shape with red and yellow coloring, making it stand out among other varieties. Crisp, sweet and tart, the RiverBelle is a favorite among those who love Honeycrisp but want a similar apple earlier in the apple season!

McIntosh
McIntosh

The first McIntosh apple was discovered in the orchard of John McIntosh in 1811 in Ottawa, Canada. It is a semi-tart apple and is good for sauces and pies. Like most early varieties, it should be eaten soon after purchase and is not a good "keeper."

Cortland
Cortland

The Cortland apple was developed in New York in 1916. It is a cross of the McIntosh and Ben Davis apple varieties. It is a large, sweet red apple with a greenish-yellow background and a hint of tartness. It's an excellent apple for eating, salads and pies. When cut, the flesh remains white which makes it a great choice for salads and cheese trays. The Cortland apple maintains its shape in pies.

Haralson
Haralson

The Haralson apple was developed at the University of Minnesota in 1922 and is named after Charles Haralson, superintendent of the University of Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm. Haralson is a very firm, tart, reddish-green apple, which makes it an excellent choice for eating and baking. It is an extra long "keeper," so be sure to stock up for baking pies and apple crisp!

Redfree
Redfree

The original Redfree seedling was planted in 1966 in a breeding orchard in Indiana. Redfree is a medium sized red apple that has firm, white and juicy flesh. It has a sweet, mildly acidic flavor and is good for eating, pies and drying. Like most early season apples it should be eaten soon after purchase, as it has a short shelf-life.

State Fair
State Fair

The State Fair apple was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1977 and is a Mantet and Oriole cross. It is moderately tart and slightly crisp. When baked, it softens and cooks up well and is also good for sauces. Like most early varieties, it should be eaten soon after purchase, as it has an short shelf-life.

Paula Red
Paula Red

The Paula Red apple was discovered around 1960 near a block of McIntosh apples in a Michigan orchard. The apple grower who discovered it named the apple after his wife, Pauline. It has a slightly tart flavor and is slightly crisp. Paula Red cooks up well in pies and sauces. Like most early season varieties, it should be eaten soon after purchase as it has a short shelf-life.

Gala
Gala

The Gala apple is a cross between Golden Delicious and Kidd's Orange Red varieties and was originally planted in New Zealand in the 1930's. It is one of the most widely grown apples in the world. Gala is a sweet, crisp eating apple with red striping, which is also excellent for salads, sauces and baking.

Sweet Sixteen
Sweet Sixteen

The Sweet Sixteen apple was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1977. It has a crisp, juicy texture, and a sweet, unusual flavor. Some say it tastes like cherry candy, which makes it a popular eating apple. Sweet Sixteen is also an excellent pie apple.

Ginger Gold
Ginger Gold

The Ginger Gold apple was discovered in a Virginia orchard in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the 1960's and was named after the orchard owner "Ginger Harvey." Its ancestors are the Golden Delicious and Albermarle Pippen apples. Ginger Gold is an early season yellow apple with a sweet flavor and slightly crisp flesh. It cooks up nicely in pies and stays white in salads. Like most early season apple varieties, it should be eaten soon after purchase as it has a short shelf-life.

Golden Delicious
Golden Delicious

Originally discovered blooming in the apple orchards of Andrew Mullins in 1905, this apple was renamed "Golden Delicious" by Stark Brothers nursery in 1914. It is a sweet, yellow, crisp apple with a wide variety of uses; including eating, baking and sauces. Golden Delicious holds its shape when baked in a pie and also stays white when cut.

Fuji
Fuji

The Fuji apple was developed in Japan and released in 1962, although it is a cross of American varieties. It is a very crisp, sweet, reddish-pink apple, which makes it a great eating apple. Fuji is also an excellent apple for baking and sauce. When using it to make sauce, it requires little or no sugar.

Connell Red
Connell Red

The Connell Red apple was first discovered in 1949 at Connell's Orchard in Menomonie, WI as a mutation of the Fireside apple and was formally named in 1957. One of the largest apples, the Connell Red is solid red in color with a mildly sweet flavor. Its crispiness makes this apple great for eating as well as good for sauce and pie. Like most late season varieties, it is a good "keeper."

Chestnut Crab
Chestnut Crab

The Chestnut Crab able was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1949. Unlike other crab apples, Chestnut Crab is a sweet and crisp eating apple and measures 2-3 inches in size. Besides being an excellent eating apple, it can be used in jellies and sauces. Its small size makes it perfect for school lunches, and is our go-to apple for our famous "Mini Caramel Apples!"

Red Delicious
Red Delicious

Red Delicious originated at an orchard in the 1880's and was officially named in 1914 by Stark Brothers Nursery. It is a bright-red apple with a sweet taste. Primarily used as an eating apple, it is slightly crisp and freezes well.

Regent
Regent

The Regent apple was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1963 and was named in honor of the Board of Regents. It is a sweet and very crisp apple - great for eating and baking, and it keeps well in storage.

Wealthy
Wealthy

The Wealthy apple was developed in 1868 by Peter Gideon in his orchard in Maine and named after his wife "Wealthy." It is a slightly tart and crisp apple and is an excellent eating and pie apple. When baked, the apple slices soften and cook up nicely forming a delicious thick juice. Wealthy apples are a great all-around apple.

Prairie Spy
Prairie Spy

The Prairie Spy apple was developed by the University of Minnesota in 1940. It is juicy and flavorful, good for eating, baking pies and making sauces. Prairie Spy softens and cooks up nicely when baked and keeps well in storage.